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Silver as an Investment

As a precious metal, silver has been cherished for centuries. In addition to being used for jewelry, ornaments, tableware, and utensils, silver has been used as a coinage metal since the time of the Greeks. Many nations have used silver as the basic unit of monetary value. As an investment, many people choose to physically hold bullion silver in the form of silver bars, silver coins, and silver rounds.

Owning silver appeals to many because it is liquid, easily tradable, easily transportable, and is easy to weigh or measure. Additionally, it is relatively affordable precious metal. The average gold/silver ratio during the 20th century was 1:47, making silver inexpensive in this respect.

Although no investment is guaranteed to hold or gain value, many people see purchasing silver as a way to hedge against currency inflation.


US Silver Coin Values


Coin

Years
Weight
(g)
%
Silver

% of Troy oz.
Current
Silver Value
Nickel*
1942-1945
5.00
0.35
0.0563
$1.11
Liberty Head Dime
1892-1916
2.50
0.90
0.0723
$1.42
Mercury Dime
1916-1945
2.50
0.90
0.0723
$1.42
Roosevelt Dime
1946-1964
2.50
0.90
0.0723
$1.42
Liberty Head Quarter
1892-1916
6.25
0.90
0.1809
$3.56
Standing Liberty Quarter
1916-1945
6.25
0.90
0.1809
$3.56
Washington Quarter
1932-1964
6.25
0.90
0.1809
$3.56
Liberty Head Half Dollar
1892-1915
12.50
0.90
0.3617
$7.12
Walking Liberty Half
1916-1947
12.50
0.90
0.3617
$7.12
Franklin Half Dollar
1948-1963
12.50
0.90
0.3617
$7.12
Kennedy Half Dollar
1964
12.50
0.90
0.3617
$7.12
Kennedy Half Dollar
1965-1970
11.50
0.40
0.1479
$2.91
Morgan Dollar
1878-1921
26.73
0.90
0.7735
$15.23
Peace Dollar
1921-1935
26.73
0.90
0.7735
$15.23

Prices shown above represent the value of the silver in each US coin and do not take into account the values of other metals that may be in each coin. The above is presented as a guide only and should not be used solely when making a purchase or sale of any kind. Keep in mind that precious metals are weighed in "Troy" ounces. Do not use a grocery scale to measure Troy weight. Troy oz weight = .912 x "regular" ounce weight. An Oz/g conversion of .0321507466 is assumed. Value also does not take into account variances due to minting or minor coin wear, or refining or any other associated costs. When figuring how much your coin is worth, keep in mind many United States coins have collector (numismatic) value that exceed these melt estimates. No expressed or implied guarantee is made as to the accuracy of this data.